You've got He-Mail!

You’ve got He-Mail!

Why do you spend all your time hating on lesbian trans women rather than gay male assigned at birth misogynists and male identified people who rape those stuck with a hole in the front? Also, I don’t see anyone pillaging from lesbian culture, because your lot, like straight men, are the most aesthetically challenged of all. I may have been unlucky enough to be born without a penis, but don’t you dare assume all trans men were ugly butch dykes who dominated your precious femmes before transitioning. Some trans men were every bit as disgusted as going near a woman sexually as they were with having woman parts, and felt that way before going on t or getting those gross udders obliterated surgically. Heterosexual relationships are an unsexy pit of dominance and submission, and lesbians just imitate this dynamic, albeit with even worse taste in music. And if you hate trans men so much, why do you butches all bind your boobs, have crewcuts, use male nicknames, throttle your femmes with strap ons, don’t let your femmes touch you during sex, and act no different than some rage a holic bubba who beats the missus if she puts too much mayo on your sammich? As a trans man who bangs men up the ass and enjoys a loving, long term, egalitarian relationship with my beautiful feminine gay boyfriend who was born with a penis, I am endlessly curious about you bullies and your masochistic laydee friends.

 

Before I transitioned and got to join my hot feminine gay boyfriend in the men’s room, I was way more scared of the mean looking bulldaggers and the lipstick licking pregnancy obsessed bimbos in the wombmoon’s room than i ever would be of a trans girl who just wants to do her business and get out of there. Oh, and even more scary? Cow mothers bringing their already predatory male children in there and letting their boy brats peek under the stalls. Of course, all the silly uterus-brains find chulllldren adorable. Gag.

 

This argument might be valid if all trans women were pre op and wanted to penetrate at all costs, and if lesbians didn’t storm the sex shops to buy painful fake penises in order to feel manly by slamming their submissive, orgasm faking wifey’s innards and giving her urinary tract infections. Until strap on dildos in lesbian sex shops are as nonexistent as gay men buying “jenna Jameson’s strap on pussy ” from gay male sex shops, you silly macho ladies don’t have a leg to stand on. And really, that’s why you hate trans women so much…they don’t have to deal with all the gross parts of womanhood (pms, bleeding, yeast, no orgasms, rape threat, gynecologist, menopause, pregnasty, cellulite, etc) and you do!

 

– Super Short

 

[sic.]

[posted here]

Photo of Germaine Greer that accompanied the letter in theGuardian

Photo of Germaine Greer that accompanied the Guardian letter

Letter from the Guardian:

“We cannot allow censorship and silencing of individuals

Universities have a particular responsibility to resist this kind of bullying

The Observer, Friday 13 February 2015 19.04 EST

The fate of Kate Smurthwaite’s comedy show, cancelled by Goldsmith’s College in London last month (“What could be more absurd than censorship on campus”, Nick Cohen, Comment) is part of a worrying pattern of intimidation and silencing of individuals whose views are deemed “transphobic” or “whorephobic”. Most of the people so labelled are feminists or pro-feminist men, some have experience in the sex industry, some are transgender.

Last month, there were calls for the Cambridge Union to withdraw a speaking invitation to Germaine Greer; then the Green party came under pressure to repudiate the philosophy lecturer Rupert Read after he questioned the arguments put forward by some trans-activists. The feminist activist and writer Julie Bindel has been “no-platformed” by the National Union of Students for several years.

“No platforming” used to be a tactic used against self-proclaimed fascists and Holocaust-deniers. But today it is being used to prevent the expression of feminist arguments critical of the sex industry and of some demands made by trans activists. The feminists who hold these views have never advocated or engaged in violence against any group of people. Yet it is argued that the mere presence of anyone said to hold those views is a threat to a protected minority group’s safety.

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terf

coda gardner rapists terfs

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Germaine Greer: Kicking Ass and Taking Names

Germaine Greer: Kicking Ass and Taking Names

Iconic feminist Germaine Greer kicked off her UK tour in support of “Disappearing Women” at the Cambridge Union Society this Monday evening past, in what was reported to be a rousing, triumphant success. Attempts by anti-feminist transgender activists to have her speech censored failed, potential threats by males who believe they are female were ameliorated by frisking attendees at the doors, and she spoke to a packed house.

From the Cambridge Varsity:

 “Despite the queue created by the heightened security measures, the atmosphere of the crowd was eager but not angry – there were few signs of protest except for a few LGBT+ representatives handing out leaflets at the door. They declined to comment on their decision to boycott the event, and there was little of the sense of outrage that had characterised the statements of the LGBT+ community.

Greer was uncompromising in her rhetoric, condemning from the beginning of her speech the “pressure on women to be clean, sweet, perfumed and submissive” and later suggested that trans women do not know what it is to “have a big, hairy, smelly vagina”. Greer was robust in her championing of the woman as an autonomous person and was anxious not to be diverted into what she described as “side issues”.

Witty and acerbic, Greer had the audience laughing throughout; describing the Sun website as a “fantasmagoria of nipples” whilst simultaneously speaking passionately and intensely about her notion of “the disappearing woman”.

She cited examples of cases in which women are judged but go unheard, condemning the fact that “nobody bothers to investigate” the perspective of women such as Amanda Hutton, who was widely reviled in the media. Her championing of sexual liberation and power for women was clear as she invited her audience to “kick ass and take names and talk loud and make a crowd”.

In the wake of the LGBT+ Cambridge campaign and its recent domination of student media, audience members were relentless in their questioning of  Greer on her exclusion of transgender women from her feminist ideas. Greer remained steadfast in her stipulation that her feminism was about women and appeared visibly angered by the fact that discussion lingered upon what she clearly felt to be a side issue: “I’ve got 51 per cent of the world to think about and I’ve got to talk about transphobia”.

When a student quoted her own words back to her she did not compromise her previous position and repeated the word  “delusion” to describe the wish of men to become women, causing a stir amongst the audience with her antipathy towards any presentation of men in drag: “I hate Mrs Brown”.

However, such discussion was secondary to Greer’s address of the body image problems of the 21st century. She explicitly stated that it remained the obligation of feminists to rage against the pressure on women to “have a baby and then go back to looking like a 12 year old boy ten days later”.

Strident and controversial as ever – describing Harriet Harman as “not smart enough” and referring to The Guardian Newspaper as “the fucking Guardian” – Greer seemed piqued but unfazed by the opposition of students to her speech because of her transgender views.

Her message to students was clear and impassioned. “We need to recognise women as human beings,” she said, and demanded of her female audience that they “toughen up; be more difficult. Be braver.”

 

Internally "non-binary" anti-feminist protest organizer Em Travis

Internally “non-binary” anti-feminist protest organizer Em Travis

A small “boycott” event was held in response in a classroom elsewhere by anti-feminist transgenderists. Organized by Em Travis, a feminine young woman who identifies as “internally non-binary transgender” the protest event featured two male transsexuals who campaign against feminism and lesbian rights. The first, Andrew “Roz” Kaveney, is best known as the founder of “Feminists Against Censorship”, a deceptively named organization whose purpose is to protect and promote the “rights” of transwomen and other males to consume what is defined in the UK as “extreme violent pornography”: that which depicts what appear to be “life-threatening or seriously injurious” acts. In Kaveney’s topsy-turvy world, “being female” is a lifestyle choice for men, and “Feminism” is the active promotion of the most violent sexualized acts against women imaginable.

The other middle-aged male selected by transtrender Em Travis to chair her event was Christopher “Aunty Sarah” Brown, an anti-gay activist who was formally protested by women at London’s Dyke March this year.

According to the Varsity, Greer’s brash and humorous tone was not duplicated at the protest event, where: “The [transgender] talk took place in a mindful and open atmosphere created by the strict and very comprehensive guidelines – including the use of verbal trigger warnings when addressing potentially offensive or harmful content – to which all audience members closely adhered.”

Funniest headline of the day from Joe Goodman of the Cambridge Tab

Funniest headline of the day from Joe Goodman of the Cambridge Tab

Males (both transgender and not) continue to pearl-clutch in the wake of Germaine Greer’s presentation: over her frank speech, but mainly over her lack of capitulation to transgenderism, a view they seemed to desperately want to hear, over and over again. Expect this formula to rinse and repeat as the legendary Woman’s Liberationist continues her appearances on her “Disappearing Women” tour across the UK. Do catch her at an upcoming scheduled event near you!

2014-11-16-transawarebristol

This past November, signs placed in restrooms at the University of Bristol by a group of Trans Activists “came under fire from the feminist community”.

You can read one response to the signs (pictured above) by Glosswitch HERE, where she says:

“Hey, check out this poster from #transawarebristol! Isn’t it inclusive? Isn’t it liberating? Doesn’t it say everything you’d want it to say? No more shall bigoted females take it upon themselves to have opinions about who should share enclosed spaces with them; after all, it’s not up to them! Fuck them and their irrational, hysterical little phobias! Only some people are allowed to feel threatened, or to have an idea about what womanhood means, and it sure as hell isn’t them. Other people know best.

I’ll be honest: I am struggling to see how this type of “don’t worry your pretty little head about this, proto-bigot” approach to gender liberation is of use to anyone. Women don’t worry about personal safety for the fun of it, nor do they seek to set their own boundaries just because they’re stupid and mean. They have fears relating to male bodies that are real and valid, and a sense of self that is as authentic as anyone else’s. Telling them “well, you shouldn’t – other people’s feelings come first” is just misogyny 101.”

 

University of Bristol women have since taken to replacing the signs with these, in protest:

university of bristol direct action

 

Men who fancy themselves “transwomen” claim to be mystified as to why females would be concerned about their personal safety sharing areas of public nudity with males.

“Why? I have no idea”, writes John “Jane Fae” Ozimek, a transgender bloke well over six foot two, in an Independent op-ed today.

John "became Jane" but still doesn't understand women.

John “became Jane” but still doesn’t understand women.

“I get that there are still debates to be had about gender and sex and biology and genes”, he says with a handwave. But the only answer he, as a male, can imagine is that women must be worried about his “farty sounds”. Whatever women’s concerns are for safety and comfort are of no concern to a male like him. He instructs real women to know their place: “..the user of a loo knows their own gender better than you, and it is not for you to challenge it.”

Women give menz sadz.

Women give menz sadz.

GenderTrender applauds and encourages this direct action and protest by the women of the University of Bristol against Female Erasing Trans Activism and sexist, patronizing anti-women “transwomen” like “Fae”.

EXCELLENT WORK, women!

university of bristol direct action 2

TransMirror

“Often, I wanted to be a girl.

I’d wanted that, off and on, since I was about nine years old. I was often mistaken for a girl as a child, and once puberty, which wasn’t pretty, more or less ended, I could sometimes pass for a girl again. One school journey as a sixth former, staying in a French hotel and having consumed a glass of wine or two, I happily let the girls dress me in their make-up and clothes. (I stuck a photo of that evening in a diary and labelled it “the feminine mystique.” My dad saw it and said, “What the hell do you think you’re playing at.”)

I found different ways of making sense of these feelings from childhood onwards, framing them through whatever I found available. At age nine, I fantasized that I could have a switch like the one on my Telstar Pong game that flipped between GAME and TV, except mine would read BOY and GIRL. In my early twenties, when the feelings either didn’t go away or returned again, I had much more freedom to dress up how I liked, and a circle of friends who accepted it. I read comic books like Neil Gaiman’s gender-playful Sandman, the sex-shifting Shade The Changing Man, Doom Patrol, with a hermaphrodite superhero, and Enigma, which concluded with a chapter simply titled “Queer.” One Christmas my grandma gave me a £10 check and, subversively, I used it to pay for a mail-order pamphlet called The Transvestite’s Guide to London. That was the vocabulary of the time. Those were the discourses of the time, the early 1990s. Twenty years later, when I did have Twitter, Facebook, and Tumblr, I found different words that also made sense of my feelings and experiences.

So by the 2010s I thought I was pretty set. I thought I knew a lot. I thought I knew about feminism. I thought I knew about gender. I had a lot to learn.

I’m sure everything about my account above is steaming with privilege, with confidence, with complacency. Books, travel, toys, cool parents, even famous family friends. It’s hard to quantify how much of that is due to factors like class and ethnicity, but I think I willfully ignored how much of it was to do with being born and raised as male. Whenever I imagined myself as a girl or woman, I saw myself as a high school Supergirl, as Elle Woods from Legally Blonde or Cher from Clueless: popular, smart, sharp, a perfect balance of charmingly charismatic and self-effacingly adorable. I imagined it happening like magic. I imagined, but I didn’t really think. I didn’t think about what it would really mean to grow up that way, under those conditions, and to become a woman within our society: a warzone, effectively, with women as the constant target.

Just as I was self-centered enough to never have considered my own mother as someone with a richer and more fascinating life than my own, I’d denied the fact that, despite my research, despite my reading, despite my good intentions, I had been successfully trained up as a boy, and then a man, within patriarchy. Yes, as a white middle-class man; but it was patriarchy that did the most work on me. Yes, I often felt so uncomfortable within the frameworks of masculinity that I dodged desperately to escape and become something different, but still, patriarchy did its work, and when it suited me, I embraced it and I accepted its benefits.

I’m still glad social media didn’t exist when I was a teenager. But it was social media that put me in contact—initially, in conflict—with women who pointed out what I should have seen years ago. I made demands of women online that I wouldn’t make of men. I challenged them, expecting answers, in a way I wouldn’t challenge men. Some ingrained, entitled part of me expected them to provide me with information on demand. I expected women to shush when I spoke. I expected to hold the floor. I expected to be thanked and praised for gestures in their direction. I expected to be the hero.

Then I talked to women who didn’t let that happen, and it briefly shocked me. Maybe social media, with its anonymity, enables more direct, no-nonsense responses to strangers than I was used to in real life, where women might be more inclined to raise their eyebrows and keep their peace: but I was told to hold my tongue, to butt out of conversations, to go away and read.

And, surprising myself a little, I did what I was told. I went away and read. I read a lot. I read blogs written that morning, and books anthologizing feminist pamphlets from the 1960s. I read pieces that contradicted each other, and I followed debates, and thought about them. But more importantly, I genuinely backed off, for one of the first times in my life. I accepted the role of a minor, almost-insignificant supporting character, rather than the hero, for once. I sometimes asked to join conversations between women and I was ignored, and it smarted but I swallowed it. So instead, I read: and online, of course, that’s a form of listening. Social media has many flaws, but one of its strengths is that through reading, you can listen and learn without bothering anyone: You can read and absorb, without feeling the need to interrupt and give your opinion. That’s an important instinct, I think, for a man to overcome: the feeling that everyone is waiting for your opinion. And because I was given no choice, I managed it. And then after a while, I sometimes spoke up, and when they had time, the women listened and responded, sometimes cautiously, but for the most part generously and encouragingly.

Perhaps with hindsight, my long-term, helpless yearning to be a girl, or later a woman, has always been more about not-wanting to be a boy or man. But it took me a long time to understand what not-being a man, on a social level, has to involve.”

Excerpted from here: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/120788/men-who-want-be-feminists-should-shut-and-listen-women

.

GallusMag:

Charity Caswell aka Daniel E Caswell aka Charity Lynn Caswell aka Ravyn Sorrow aka Soulless Empire aka Welsh Goth Girl

39 years old

Fixed income SSI

Originally from Columbus, Ohio

Phoenix AZ

Currently: Northern Nevada

See comments for more.

Originally posted on Gender Identity Watch:

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