Sex “SELF ID”

October 13, 2018

https://fairplayforwomen.com

https://fairplayforwomen.com

Hai! When you see me wearing a bow on my head- like so many top female business executives do- it means I’m a woman!

The Financial Times released its list of the Top 100 Female Business Executives of 2018 and awarded spot number 32 to the decidedly male alter-ego and crossdressing persona of transvestite Philip Bunce. 

So proud! Diversity! Humbled! Equality for sexually-harassing male kinksters oppressed in the workplace by the presence of women!

Philip Bunce is (what else?) a wealthy and powerful white heterosexual man, who abuses his position by showing up to his job as Director of Credit Suisse Financial Services dressed a few days a week in a ghastly stereotype of “womanhood” and sexually harassing his employees by forcing them to address him as “Pippa” or “Pips” on the days when he is “in role”.

He’s such a pip as a laydee! Intersectionality!

Philip’s Twitter profile lists him as a “Proud Father, Lucky Husband, Gender Fluid, Credit Suisse Director, Proud LGBT Ally”. He doesn’t even identify as a “transwoman”. Yet the Financial Times equates Philip’s activities on those days when he dresses as an awful caricature in woman-face with the genuine experiences of actual women striving against all odds to succeed in business dominated by such men. It takes a real man only two days a week for his lipstick wearing alter-ego to become the 32nd top female business executive in the world apparently.

Straight male. #32 Female Business Executive Worldwide according to Financial Times list.

The Financial Times not only approves of Philip Bunce sexually harassing his employees by forcing them to participate under duress with his sexual kink in the workplace, they saw fit to eliminate an unnamed actual female executive from their list in preference of his sexist pantomime, which the Financial Times regards as on par with actual female executives.

No single woman on the Financial Times list of the Top Female Business Executives – or any other woman in any global work situation of any type (excepting prostitution or stripping) would be taken seriously while wearing the hideous mini-skirts, grotesquely drawn on eyebrows, and literal bow-on-the-head (seriously? a fucking bow on the head?) atop trashy wig that Philip Bunce dons to express his perspective on what he believes women are.

He’s a business laydee!

According to the Financial Times (and editor Lionel Barber) female business executives should be taken as seriously, and accorded the same respect, as a sexually-harassing male executive kinkster’s skanky disgusting sexist part-time transvestite alter-ego.

Philip Bunce, in proudly accepting his male place at number 32 on the Financial Times list of Top Female Executives took the opportunity to take a swipe at (who else?) feminists, i.e.. “TERFS”.

BBC- Transgender Prisoners

September 11, 2018

 

More:

http://transcrimeuk.com/2018/07/17/karen-white/

Headline at The Times UK

Very interesting article today in The Times UK regarding Mark Hellen of Goldsmith’s University.

From The Times:

 

“Trans Goldsmiths lecturer Natacha Kennedy behind smear campaign against academics

Lucy Bannerman

September 8 2018, 12:01am,

The Times

Natacha Kennedy asked people to list academics deemed to be transphobic

A transgender lecturer orchestrated a smear campaign against academics across the UK in which universities were described as dangerous and accused of “hate crime” if they refused to accept activists’ views that biological males can be women, it can be revealed.

Natacha Kennedy, a researcher at Goldsmiths University of London who is also understood to work there under the name Mark Hellen, faces accusations of a “ludicrous” assault on academic freedom after she invited thousands of members of a closed Facebook group to draw up and circulate a list shaming academics who disagreed with campaigners’ theories on gender.

The online forum, seen by The Times, also revealed that members plotted to accuse non-compliant professors of hate crime to try to have them ousted from their jobs. Reading, Sussex, Bristol, Warwick and Oxford universities were among those deemed to have “unsafe” departments because they employed academics who had publicly disputed the belief that “transwomen are women” or questioned the potential impact of proposed changes to gender laws on women and children.

Ms Kennedy said that the list was necessary so students could avoid accepting a place on a “dangerous” course.

Aimee Challenor, the former Green Party candidate who used her father as her election agent even though he was facing charges of raping and torturing a ten-year-old girl, for which he was later jailed, was among those who responded to Ms Kennedy’s post of August 14 to the Trans Rights UK Facebook group, with suggestions of who to blacklist. All the named academics were women.

Members of the group claimed that the philosophy department of the University of Sussex was “clearly an unsafe environment” because of the presence of Kathleen Stock, a professor who has argued against redefining the category of woman and lesbian to include men.

“File a hate crime report against her, and then the chairman and vice-chair,” advised one. “Drag them over the f***ing coals.”

Rosa Freedman, an expert in human rights law at the University of Reading, had also upset activists by saying that biological males should not have access to a women’s refuge. One activist said she tried to lodge a complaint but was told that Professor Freedman had a right to free speech. “I’m replying a little more strongly and using the words ‘hate speech’ a few times,” she told the group. Another activist suggested: “Use the words . . . ‘So Reading University supports staff who use hate speech against students?’ ”

Professor Freedman told The Times: “We are talking about the aggressive trolling of women who are experts. I have received penis pictures telling me to ‘suck my girl cock’. This is straight-up, aggressive, anti-woman misogyny. In no way have I made the space unsafe. I find it deeply distressing that an academic would set out to smear my name and impugn my reputation, simply because I put forward a perspective, based on robust and specific evidence, with which they disagree. That is not academia. That is silencing people.

“The idea that writing about women’s rights automatically becomes a hate crime in some people’s eyes is ludicrous. All it has done has made me more determined to write about this, in a respectful way that allows other perspectives to come through, and not just the views of those who shout the loudest.”

Professor Stock said: “What would make a philosophy department unsafe is if its academics weren’t allowed to challenge currently popular beliefs or ideologies for fear of offending. Deliberately plotting to have my department lose students, or to have me dismissed, through covert means, is surprising behaviour from a fellow academic.” Both professors praised the support that they had received from their universities.

Last month Brown University, the Ivy League institution in Rhode Island, was accused of cowardice by leading academics in the US after it caved into pressure on social media to pull a piece of research from its website that had concluded that social contagion could be a reason why clusters of young people were identifying as trans.

Professor Stock said: “It is head-scratchingly bizarre how so many public organisations, many of them ostensibly progressive, have capitulated to passive-aggressive, emotionally blackmailing, and sometimes even outright threatening behaviour from trans activists, often online.”

One member of the Facebook group, Sahra Rae Taylor, stood by her contribution to the list. She said: “That way we can advise people applying that ‘if you want to study law, then don’t go to these places’. Which would allow them at least to avoid being taught (and marked, and under the influence in some way) by a transphobic douchebag.”

Ms Kennedy, who describes herself on Facebook as a “stroppy, bolshie transgirl with attitude who hates the Tories with a passion”, refused to comment. She represented Goldsmiths during trans awareness week in February.

It confirmed that she was an employee but would not explain which department she worked in or why she appeared to be listed twice in the staff directory: once as Mark Hellen, in the department of educational studies, and secondly as Natacha Kennedy, who is named in equality and diversity reports. Both profiles appear to be active.

It also remained unclear why an academic paper on Ms Kennedy’s specialist subject of transgenderism in children, published by the Graduate Journal of Social Sciences in 2010, cited two co-authors: Natacha Kennedy and Mark Hellen.

Read more from The Times report by clicking HERE.

Natacha Kennedy is well known to GenderTrender readers as Mark Hellen.

Mark presents himself professionally as a married heterosexual white male academic but prefers to pretend online to be a terrifically oppressed “transwoman” named Natacha Kennedy.

Goldsmith’s Mark Hellen and his alter Natacha Kennedy

Mark’s alternate Linkedin persona.

Goldsmith’s College is so invested in Mark’s dual identities that they knowingly misrepresent him professionally both as himself and also as an entirely different fictional person named Natacha Kennedy.

Mark Hellen is a failed-to-complete Phd candidate who pretends to collaborate with another academic failure, who is actually himself, wearing an ill-advised wig, as crossdresser Natacha Kennedy. He literally cosigns his professional work as a collaboration between two people: himself and his alter ego.

This results in many humorous circumstances, such as the time The Daily Nous cited discrepancies between the work of Mark Hellen and that of his fictional yet equally inept alter ego, Natacha Kennedy:

The Daily Kos humorously cites discrepancies between the research of Mark Hellen and his equally inadequate alter ego.

Goldsmith’s Mark Hellen’s interests largely pivot upon three axis:

Number one: Transvestitism.

“Going Girlie”

Number Two: Outrageous conspiracy theories about his feminist enemies.

I’ll just leave this here…

and Number Three- his keen interest in children.

Mark Hellen first tried to establish a transgender children community, called, creatively, “Transkids”.

Mark tried to establish a transgender children charity.

When the TransKids project failed, Mark Hellen used his Goldsmith’s credentials to attempt to recruit child “research subjects” into meeting with him, using his Natacha Kennedy persona:

Call for youth

Questions will vary. Just really interested in you. I’ll pay.

It would take the internet 24 years at full speed to unlock whatever Mark Hellen does with the kids he recruits. So no worries. *cough*

..

 

4thWaveNow

by Marie Verite

 In the six days since the launch of the petition urging Brown University and PLoS One to continue supporting research into the sharp increase in youth—particularly females—who seek medical intervention for gender dysphoria, over 3700 have signed and over 1060 have written comments. The initial signature goal was 1000, which was quickly surpassed in less than 12 hours; the goal has since been continuously raised. As of this writing it stands at 4000.

The signatories include many families affected by rapid onset gender dysphoria (ROGD), medical professionals, therapists, doctors, and academics. You can read them all—and sign the petition, if you have not yet—here.  A small sampler of the 1000+ comments:


— Lee Jussim – Chair Psychology Department, Rutgers University “If it’s wrong, let someone produce evidence that it is wrong. Until that time, if the research pisses some people off, who cares? Galileo…

View original post 1,228 more words

Rainbow Double Helix (DNA)

Excerpts from a letter by Diane Ehrensaft to The Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Read the full letter HERE. Ehrensaft is a psychologist who is considered by some to be the “premiere expert” in the field of pediatric transgenderism. Read more about her extraordinary theories on “Gender Angels” and “Gender Ghosts” by clicking HERE. Diane Ehrensaft’s work is distinguished by a profound metaphysical belief that sex stereotypes (femininity, masculinity) are biologically innate components of reproductive sex, rather than social traditions constructed to ritualize female subjugation to males.

Excerpts from Diane Ehrensaft’s letter:

————————————————–

“Our gender clinic at the Child and Adolescent Gender Center at UCSF Benio Children’s Hospital has a continual flow of children and adolescents I have come to refer to as “the double helix rainbow kids.” I coined this term to refer to the overlapping spectra this group of youth find themselves on— the autism spectrum and the gender spectrum.”


“The twenty- first century has been accompanied by a dramatic paradigm shift in Western concepts and practices of gender. No longer is gender considered to exist in two distinct non-overlapping boxes—male/female. The construct of the gender binary has been replaced by the image of the gender spectrum, an array of gender shades and hues of infinite variety, oscillating between the poles of masculine and feminine (Ehrensaft 2012, 2016; Hidalgo et al. 2013; Keo-Meier and Ehrensaft 2018).

Even beyond that is the notion of a gender web, a three-dimensional interweaving of nature, nurture, and culture, accompanied by a fourth dimension of time, in which each individual spins together their own unique gender identity (who I am as male, female, or other) and gender expressions (how I “do” my gender—dress, appearance, activities, etc.) to arrive at their authentic gender self. Based on the interstices of constitution, socialization, and environmental context, no two people’s gender webs will be exactly the same (Ehrensaft 2011, 2016).

Rather than static or fixed by age six, which is what is postulated in traditional theories of gender development and constancy (Kohlberg 1966; Tyson 1986; Fast 1999), the gender web pulsates and resituates itself over the course of a life time, which explains why some people who have consistently lived in one gender for many years may gradually or suddenly arrive at an understanding that this gender is no longer a good fit (Harris 2005).

Actual slide from Ehrensaft lecture on “pulsating gender webs”.

We have also learned that gender does not lie between our legs, but rather between our ears—in the messages of our brain as to who we are (Diamond 2002).

This brings us to some particular idiosyncrasies of double helix rainbow individuals. Typically diagnosed early in life as being on the autism spectrum, their early childhoods may be devoid of any self-reference to gender at all. Even though their parents may have told them, “You are a boy” or “You are a girl,” for the child, these markers may be empty signifiers. As one double helix rainbow transgender youth expressed, asked when they first realized they were transgen- der: “When I was little, I didn’t think about gender at all. It was a category that had no meaning to me. I was just a person. Only when my body started to change, when I was 12, did I suddenly come to the startling, and awful, realization that I had a gender. I hated it and I certainly didn’t want to be the one my body was telling me I was going to have to be.”

Unpacking this youth’s narrative gives us much food for thought as we read through this journal’s issue on autism and gender. To understand a person who is neurodiverse, a neurotypical person needs to leave the comfort of their own social position and view from the inside out, from the neurodiverse person’s perspective.

With gender, the neurodiverse individual’s experience may be the most revolutionary of all in deconstructing a society’s fixed and unbending mores of gender. It is sometimes theorized that the reason so many people on the autism spectrum show up in gender clinics with either gender dysphoria or an asserted transgender identity is that they have failed to read the social cues that interpersonally guide and shape us in our understanding of our gender selves (Strang et al. 2018). If that is so, we might also say that the neurodiverse cohort is freed from the social constrictions and binding mores of “correct” gender roles and behavior, allowing them a far more creative gender journey, in line with the twenty-first century understanding of gender in its multiplicity and expansiveness rather than its entrapment in two designated boxes. We might also say it is not the autistic, but the neurotypical folks who are failing to read the social cues so poignantly provided by the neurodiverse community.

Both clinicians and parents have been known to interpret the insistence on a transgender or non-binary gender identity that shows up more prevalently in autistic children than in their non-autistic peers as just an obsessive phase, like so many other obsessions the autistic child passes through. It is interesting to note that, using teacher ratings on the child behavior checklist, elevated levels of obsessional interests have also been identified by Dr. Kenneth Zucker and associates as a feature of “gender referred” children at their gender clinic compared to non-referred children (Zucker et al. 2017). I do question the interpretation of these data, with the teacher ratings of obsessional interests of the gender-referred children on the child behavior checklist perhaps having more to do with a sense of urgency, a pushback toward others who are attempting to thwart their gender expressions or interests, a bias on the teachers’ parts toward those gender-diverse interests, or a need on the child’s part to communicate to others in an exaggerated fashion a gender identity or non- conforming gender expression rather than an indication of obsessionality. Still, the implication is that double helix rainbow kids may also have a double dosage of obsessionality.

With that said, if an obsessional phase was at the root of the neurodiverse children’s assertion of a transgender or gender-nonbinary self,, the phase should dissipate over time, like other obsessional interests; yet it does not. [sic]

Unlike the children who report no sense of gender at all in their early life, there are other autistic children who declare a transgender identity at an early age and do not back down or divert from that message. Rather than a passing phase, the gender declarations can become more insistent or urgent over time, especially if the request for acknowledgement is denied or overridden by the adults in the child’s life.

In lieu of “just a phase,” a more salient argument for the prevalence of transgender or non-conforming gender articulations among neurodiverse children and youth is that the bundle of neurons that may shape gender messages in the brain that say “I am not the gender that matches the sex designated to me at birth” may live side-by-side or interactively with the bundle of neurons that shape autistic experience, creating a cohesive mosaic of neurodiverse/gender diverse individuality.

What we know about gender expansive/transgender experience and the experience of autism is that they both may be accompanied by a strong dose of social anxiety (Cohen- Kettenis et al. 2003; Bellini 2014); we also know that both experiences are considered to have a strong constitutional component (Rosenthal 2014, 2016; Frith and Hill 2003; Frith and Happe 2005).

With that said, I would like to finish with a story about a young autistic child presenting with an inordinate amount of anxiety. This child was diagnosed with severe autism at the age of two. At age eight, the child had minimal expressive language, consisting primarily of “Mommy, Daddy, i-Pad.” Brought to a gender clinic because of the child’s insistence that they were not a girl, but a boy, the only full sentence uttered by the child in the initial exam, in response to the parents’ reference to their child as “she,” was a loud, adamant, “Don’t say she, say HE.” The child made no eye contact, shied from any physical contact, and anxiously hummed and rocked. After several months of mental health treatment with a gender specialist who also had experience with autism, the family, with the therapist’s support, allowed their child to begin living full-time as the boy the child consistently asserted they were. Sometime after that, the child returned for their follow-up visit at the gender clinic. The clinic team was astounded to discover a child who strode into the clinic, shook hands with the team, made eye contact, and began talking in full, although truncated, sentences. The stunning observation leaves us with a question to ponder, “Could gender be an alleviator for the stressors of autism?” Not every person with a diagnosis of autism will be gender expansive, but it might behoove us to find that out, and more generally, to remind ourselves that gender is a fluid concept that may be experienced and expressed differently, depending on whether one is neuro- diverse or neurotypical.”


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