Rainbow Double Helix (DNA)

Excerpts from a letter by Diane Ehrensaft to The Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Read the full letter HERE. Ehrensaft is a psychologist who is considered by some to be the “premiere expert” in the field of pediatric transgenderism. Read more about her extraordinary theories on “Gender Angels” and “Gender Ghosts” by clicking HERE. Diane Ehrensaft’s work is distinguished by a profound metaphysical belief that sex stereotypes (femininity, masculinity) are biologically innate components of reproductive sex, rather than social traditions constructed to ritualize female subjugation to males.

Excerpts from Diane Ehrensaft’s letter:

————————————————–

“Our gender clinic at the Child and Adolescent Gender Center at UCSF Benio Children’s Hospital has a continual flow of children and adolescents I have come to refer to as “the double helix rainbow kids.” I coined this term to refer to the overlapping spectra this group of youth find themselves on— the autism spectrum and the gender spectrum.”


“The twenty- first century has been accompanied by a dramatic paradigm shift in Western concepts and practices of gender. No longer is gender considered to exist in two distinct non-overlapping boxes—male/female. The construct of the gender binary has been replaced by the image of the gender spectrum, an array of gender shades and hues of infinite variety, oscillating between the poles of masculine and feminine (Ehrensaft 2012, 2016; Hidalgo et al. 2013; Keo-Meier and Ehrensaft 2018).

Even beyond that is the notion of a gender web, a three-dimensional interweaving of nature, nurture, and culture, accompanied by a fourth dimension of time, in which each individual spins together their own unique gender identity (who I am as male, female, or other) and gender expressions (how I “do” my gender—dress, appearance, activities, etc.) to arrive at their authentic gender self. Based on the interstices of constitution, socialization, and environmental context, no two people’s gender webs will be exactly the same (Ehrensaft 2011, 2016).

Rather than static or fixed by age six, which is what is postulated in traditional theories of gender development and constancy (Kohlberg 1966; Tyson 1986; Fast 1999), the gender web pulsates and resituates itself over the course of a life time, which explains why some people who have consistently lived in one gender for many years may gradually or suddenly arrive at an understanding that this gender is no longer a good fit (Harris 2005).

Actual slide from Ehrensaft lecture on “pulsating gender webs”.

We have also learned that gender does not lie between our legs, but rather between our ears—in the messages of our brain as to who we are (Diamond 2002).

This brings us to some particular idiosyncrasies of double helix rainbow individuals. Typically diagnosed early in life as being on the autism spectrum, their early childhoods may be devoid of any self-reference to gender at all. Even though their parents may have told them, “You are a boy” or “You are a girl,” for the child, these markers may be empty signifiers. As one double helix rainbow transgender youth expressed, asked when they first realized they were transgen- der: “When I was little, I didn’t think about gender at all. It was a category that had no meaning to me. I was just a person. Only when my body started to change, when I was 12, did I suddenly come to the startling, and awful, realization that I had a gender. I hated it and I certainly didn’t want to be the one my body was telling me I was going to have to be.”

Unpacking this youth’s narrative gives us much food for thought as we read through this journal’s issue on autism and gender. To understand a person who is neurodiverse, a neurotypical person needs to leave the comfort of their own social position and view from the inside out, from the neurodiverse person’s perspective.

With gender, the neurodiverse individual’s experience may be the most revolutionary of all in deconstructing a society’s fixed and unbending mores of gender. It is sometimes theorized that the reason so many people on the autism spectrum show up in gender clinics with either gender dysphoria or an asserted transgender identity is that they have failed to read the social cues that interpersonally guide and shape us in our understanding of our gender selves (Strang et al. 2018). If that is so, we might also say that the neurodiverse cohort is freed from the social constrictions and binding mores of “correct” gender roles and behavior, allowing them a far more creative gender journey, in line with the twenty-first century understanding of gender in its multiplicity and expansiveness rather than its entrapment in two designated boxes. We might also say it is not the autistic, but the neurotypical folks who are failing to read the social cues so poignantly provided by the neurodiverse community.

Both clinicians and parents have been known to interpret the insistence on a transgender or non-binary gender identity that shows up more prevalently in autistic children than in their non-autistic peers as just an obsessive phase, like so many other obsessions the autistic child passes through. It is interesting to note that, using teacher ratings on the child behavior checklist, elevated levels of obsessional interests have also been identified by Dr. Kenneth Zucker and associates as a feature of “gender referred” children at their gender clinic compared to non-referred children (Zucker et al. 2017). I do question the interpretation of these data, with the teacher ratings of obsessional interests of the gender-referred children on the child behavior checklist perhaps having more to do with a sense of urgency, a pushback toward others who are attempting to thwart their gender expressions or interests, a bias on the teachers’ parts toward those gender-diverse interests, or a need on the child’s part to communicate to others in an exaggerated fashion a gender identity or non- conforming gender expression rather than an indication of obsessionality. Still, the implication is that double helix rainbow kids may also have a double dosage of obsessionality.

With that said, if an obsessional phase was at the root of the neurodiverse children’s assertion of a transgender or gender-nonbinary self,, the phase should dissipate over time, like other obsessional interests; yet it does not. [sic]

Unlike the children who report no sense of gender at all in their early life, there are other autistic children who declare a transgender identity at an early age and do not back down or divert from that message. Rather than a passing phase, the gender declarations can become more insistent or urgent over time, especially if the request for acknowledgement is denied or overridden by the adults in the child’s life.

In lieu of “just a phase,” a more salient argument for the prevalence of transgender or non-conforming gender articulations among neurodiverse children and youth is that the bundle of neurons that may shape gender messages in the brain that say “I am not the gender that matches the sex designated to me at birth” may live side-by-side or interactively with the bundle of neurons that shape autistic experience, creating a cohesive mosaic of neurodiverse/gender diverse individuality.

What we know about gender expansive/transgender experience and the experience of autism is that they both may be accompanied by a strong dose of social anxiety (Cohen- Kettenis et al. 2003; Bellini 2014); we also know that both experiences are considered to have a strong constitutional component (Rosenthal 2014, 2016; Frith and Hill 2003; Frith and Happe 2005).

With that said, I would like to finish with a story about a young autistic child presenting with an inordinate amount of anxiety. This child was diagnosed with severe autism at the age of two. At age eight, the child had minimal expressive language, consisting primarily of “Mommy, Daddy, i-Pad.” Brought to a gender clinic because of the child’s insistence that they were not a girl, but a boy, the only full sentence uttered by the child in the initial exam, in response to the parents’ reference to their child as “she,” was a loud, adamant, “Don’t say she, say HE.” The child made no eye contact, shied from any physical contact, and anxiously hummed and rocked. After several months of mental health treatment with a gender specialist who also had experience with autism, the family, with the therapist’s support, allowed their child to begin living full-time as the boy the child consistently asserted they were. Sometime after that, the child returned for their follow-up visit at the gender clinic. The clinic team was astounded to discover a child who strode into the clinic, shook hands with the team, made eye contact, and began talking in full, although truncated, sentences. The stunning observation leaves us with a question to ponder, “Could gender be an alleviator for the stressors of autism?” Not every person with a diagnosis of autism will be gender expansive, but it might behoove us to find that out, and more generally, to remind ourselves that gender is a fluid concept that may be experienced and expressed differently, depending on whether one is neuro- diverse or neurotypical.”


More:

Dr. Kate O’Hanlan explains her theories. lol, can’t make this shit up.

 

 

From their website:

Gender Odyssey Seattle is an international conference focused on the needs and interests of transgender and gender diverse children of all ages, their families and supporters, and the professionals who serve them.

Our conference is packed with thought-provoking workshops, including medical information and consultation opportunities, professional education, discussion groups, networking, children and youth programming, and social events. This annual gathering attracts people from all over the world for an uplifting weekend of connection, support, and community at the Washington State Convention & Trade Center in Seattle, USA.”

The conference is sponsored by plastic surgeons: La Belle Vie Cosmetic Surgeons (largest sponsor), Brownstein Crane Surgical Services, etc.

Tanis Wolf / Tara Flik Wolf/Tara Flik Wood

Justice prevails in the case of the young man who punched and beat Maria MacLachlan in Hyde Park on September 13 of last year as she was en route to a discussion of changes to the legal rights of women caused by a proposed re-write of the UK Gender Recognition Act. The discussion was hosted by women’s group We Need To Talk.

Tara Flik Wood (born Tanis Wolf) had posted on Facebook his intent to inflict violence on feminists before committing the attack, and his assault was captured on video by at least three people.

Assailant posted statement of intent. (Facebook)

Wolf launched a public defense campaign#FreeTheSheWolf” apparently based on the Nazi “sexploitation” B-movie “Ilsa: SheWolf of the SS”.

The transgender community widely supported Wolf/Wood’s violent actions, including many high profile trans activists such as Roz Kaveney, Ruth Pearce, Owen Jones, Shon Faye, Katelyn Burns, Bex Stinson, Zinnia Jones, among others, who considered the assault of Maria MacLachlan as a type of male “honor” crime against a woman they suspected of not adhering to their gender beliefs. No transgender rights organization, LGBT group, or transgender activist publicly condemned his assault.

Wolf was accompanied to court by Ananya Jaidev, an Oxford graduate in Literature who is reportedly herself under investigation for assaulting a woman outside a different February 2018 discussion on the impact to women’s rights caused by proposed changes to the Gender Recognition Act. She allegedly struck and snatched the eyeglasses off the face of a woman exiting the event.  Ananya Jaidev is a member of fringe group Sister’s Uncut. The group was started in 2014 as a direct action protest against government cuts to women’s services, but rapidly degenerated into a venue for posh young people to demand that strangers affirm the indefinable “gender identities” of those who believe reproductive classification should be determined by personality.

Ready for his closeup: a newly blonde Tara Wolf with Ananya Jaidev on left.

Other supporters of Tanis/Tara Wolf/Wood outside the courtroom included the unidentified blonde woman who told Times reporter Janice Turner “I’m happy they hit her” as well as a throng of Antifa men wearing masks to conceal their identities. Worth mention were a couple of basement dwellers outfitted in full combat gear who brought their pit bull for support.

Ready for combat, #FreeTheSheWolf trial attendees.

The transgender warrior tried to claim in court that he was terrified that photos of himself would be used to horrifically “out” him online as shamefully trans, but he had a public Facebook account where he was “out” and also a crowdfunder e-begging for plastic surgery money. The day after he attacked Maria he posted a succinct update to that crowdfunder, a death threat to feminists: “#DeadTerfs“.

On the first day of the two day trial, District Judge Kenneth Grant ordered the victim to pretend in court that the man who punched her was not male.

Judge Kenneth Grant ordered a woman who was assaulted by a man specifically because she is female to pretend she believes he is also female, because the male perpetrator identifies as transgender.

The Telegraph reports:

He said: “The defendant wished to be referred to as a woman, so perhaps you could refer to her as ‘she’ for the purpose of the proceedings.”

Ms MacLachlan replied: “I’m used to thinking of this person who is a male as male.”

Even the prejudicial court couldn’t hand wave the overwhelming evidence though, and so:

Guilty verdict. Women held in court due to danger from violent trans activists.

There it is. If you’re a 26 year old man with a hairdo and some lipstick you can punch a 61 year old woman in the face whenever you suspect she doesn’t really believe you are actually a woman. LGBT lobbying orgs will support you, and trash your victim. Transgender activists will embrace you and contribute money to you. The male judge will order the woman you punched to pretend she thinks you are female. You will pay a £400 fine and serve no jail time and no parole. Consider it the price to pay for your honor.

On the other hand, as @MayDay4Women opines:

A £430 doesn’t seem like much. No community service. No jail time. But, importantly, it means this violent man is barred forever from working with vulnerable groups, so blocked from working in schools, care homes etc. and now has various travel restrictions.

So at least that’s something. Until he changes his name again and gets a Gender Recognition Certificate and his records are sealed to “protect his gender identity”.

No wonder these guys hate their “dead names”.

But we’ll remember. And in time, we’ll undo the harms legal “gender recognition” perpetrates on all of us of the female sex, all of the Maria MacLachlan’s of the world.

 

 

..

The world’s first transracial children’s book for transracial children. Brought to you by TransFilipino TransWoman ‘Ja Du’ (otherwise known as white male Adam Wheeler), who runs a Trans Racialism Support Group on Facebook. Enjoy!

https://www.mystorybook.com/books/326796/

TRANS HEALTH MANIFESTO

September 20, 2017

 

‘Action For Trans Health’ Logo (Facebook)

From the UK ‘Action for Trans Health‘ Org:

TRANS HEALTH MANIFESTO

INTRODUCTION
Following the centuries-long repression of trans lives at the hands of the state, the next stage in the UK government’s war of bureaucratic attrition is the recent publication of an NHS consultation that fails in every possible capacity, and a survey that gathers less data than we’ve already presented them. We call upon everyone fighting for the health of trans people to boycott this consultation & the survey, and reject its procedures & results in full. We encourage hostile participation in the form of direct submissions of demands that don’t react to the questions posed or restrict themselves to the scope imposed by the government.

We wholly reject the NHS’s attempt to codify the abuse, torment & traumatisation of trans people under the guise of ‘healthcare’. We demand accountability for the historic & present abuse of power that the NHS has encouraged glorified psychiatrists to carry out. You do not own our bodies, you cannot control our lives, and you will not prevent our needs being met. We will not tolerate compromise.

The following living document is our vision for trans futures.

We do not consider that our work will ever be complete, there will always be greater things on the horizon. As such, this manifesto is not final, but an open draft which will evolve as we do. This is our call to action. We will fight anyone who stands in the way of universal liberation. This is war, and we will win.

Read the rest of this entry »

Pink Shorts in Public

August 27, 2013

Comments limited to those who have watched the whole thing. I wouldn’t want you to miss the surreal totality of the piece. Thanks!