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“Butterfly Kiss” by Bill Brouard

The American Sociological Association invited University of California at Davis Sociology student Kristi Hilton Ryan to present the results of an unpublished paper concerning 36 subjects at their 2016 annual meeting.

Why such a high honor for a student study of a tiny number of subjects? Popularity of the topic: family dynamics of children being diagnosed as ‘transgender’.

Hilton Ryan is a heterosexual female whose only connection with members of the LGBT is one of academic curiosity. However, rather than being an objective observer, Hilton Ryan, who has never engaged with the century plus published female-authored analysis of gender (see: feminism; women’s liberation) has stated for the record that she believes “gender”- the ritualized socially mandated roles of male domination and female subordination- should be “celebrated”.

Single parents were excluded from Hilton Ryan’s study. The co-parents of the 36 subjects were “predominantly white, middle class, geographically diverse.” Most were parents of children between the ages of 5-9 who identify their children as transgender and whose children have already “socially transitioned”, meaning they have adopted opposite sex stereotypes (name changes, clothing) and either demand a right to compel bystanders to pretend that their children are the opposite sex and/or take steps to support their child in keeping their true sex a secret (changing schools, secrecy, etc.)

Although the study is unpublished, a press release and interviews outline some of Hilton Ryan’s findings:

The parents in her study were predominantly white, middle class, and residents of the United States.

The majority of parents self identify as liberals or progressives.

Parents of transgender children were more likely than the general population to be gay, lesbian or bisexual (19%).

Prior to diagnosis as transgender “Nearly all” parents believed their children were exhibiting pre-homosexual behaviors and would develop into gay adults.

Parents tried to force their children to stop gender nonconforming behaviors such as choosing non-stereotypical toys or clothes prior to diagnosing them as transgender.

Parents of transgender children diagnosed their male children earlier: between the ages of 3-5 for males and females between 9-14.

“All” male children in the study were diagnosed as transgender by their parents before the age of five and “most” before the age of three.

“Most” female children were identified by their parents as transgender after the onset of puberty.

Parents of female children were more immediate “instant adopters” of a transgender diagnosis.

No parents in the study used the descriptors “genderqueer” or “nonbinary” or “gender fluid” to describe their child.

Mothers “overwhelmingly” take the lead in diagnosing their children as transgender.

Mothers of transgender children take on the majority of parenting responsibilities.

The majority of heterosexual mothers of transgender children are more professionally qualified than their husbands.

51% of heterosexual mothers of transgender children have advanced education that vastly exceeds their husbands.

From Diana Tourjee’s Vice.com piece titled: “How the Mother’s of Transgender Children Are Changing The World” –

“According to Ryan’s study, mothers usually take on the majority of parenting responsibilities despite being more professionally qualified than their husbands. Fifty-one percent of heterosexual mothers in Ryan’s study have “a higher level of education than their partners, with discrepancies as wide as mothers holding professional or doctoral degrees while their husband’s hold associates degrees or less,” the study reads. Nonetheless, it was the mothers in Ryan’s study that gave up their jobs in order to raise the kids and “bear the brunt of the childcare labor, and by extension the brunt of the care related to their child’s gender diversity.” One working mother told Ryan she handled more than 90 percent of her trans child’s needs, even though the kid’s father is retired.”

Transgender mother blogger “Raising Jeremy” reflected on the exalted status of traditional motherhood that she experiences in her role as parent of a transgender child in her latest post addressing a new phenomenon: women falsely identifying themselves as parents of transgender children in order to join and participate in their private groups.

“I’ve been pondering what would motivate someone to pose as a parent of a transgender child”, she writes in  “Do You Want To Be Me?”:

“From the outside looking in, for the person who is not going through what we are going through, I guess we look inspirational.  I’ve realised it’s because we are.”

She continues:

“You accepted your child, and there are days that are hard and shitty and yet you still turn up.  You turn up because one of the miracles in your family needs you.  You turn up because your child’s smile is precious and seeing it is its own reward.  You turn up because their happiness is your breath.  You are the tireless voice even when you are so very tired.  You are a million conversations with strangers to demystify being transgender / gender diverse.  You are signatures on petitions  to have discriminatory laws overturned from bathroom bills to access to cross hormone treatment.  You are strong voices howling into the maelstrom of life that our children are valid, wonderful and miraculous, look them in the eye and keep trying to deny our truth.”

She concludes:

“We are thousands of stories of ordinary people on an extraordinary parenting journey.  What binds us is that we are testament to the power of love.”

 

Hilton Ryan’s finding that mothers of transgender children are using their children to express and perform exalted female gender stereotypes of caregiving and motherhood is not unique. “Transgender” has always been used as a foil for bystanders and an opportunity to anxiously perform overt ritualized behaviors of male domination and female subordination under the guise of being “progressive”.

Witness mainstream gay male culture’s sexism, embrace of masculinity, rejection of gender nonconforming males and financing of the transgender child movement. Witness the lesbian embrasure of a soccer mom “baby boom” and rejection of feminism and gender noncompliant women. Witness liberal men passionately “white knighting” to protect the safety and dignity of the “ladies” who are male- in stark contrast to any such engagement ever offered in defense of the precarious actual rights of actual females. Witness liberal women abdicating legal protections for women in favor of protecting the feelings of men.

Transgender is an opportunity for everyone to nostalgically embrace, perform, and enforce sex-based archetypes, shrilly, on the eve of their -hopefully inevitable- collapse.

Virgin-Mary-Assumption-0311Ma maaaa!

What Makes a Woman? By Elinor Burkett

Image credit: Julie Doucet

Image credit: Julie Doucet

Do women and men have different brains?

Back when Lawrence H. Summers was president of Harvard and suggested that they did, the reaction was swift and merciless. Pundits branded him sexist. Faculty members deemed him a troglodyte. Alumni withheld donations.

But when Bruce Jenner said much the same thing in an April interview with Diane Sawyer, he was lionized for his bravery, even for his progressivism.

“My brain is much more female than it is male,” he told her, explaining how he knew that he was transgender.

This was the prelude to a new photo spread and interview in Vanity Fair that offered us a glimpse into Caitlyn Jenner’s idea of a woman: a cleavage-boosting corset, sultry poses, thick mascara and the prospect of regular “girls’ nights” of banter about hair and makeup. Ms. Jenner was greeted with even more thunderous applause. ESPN announced it would give Ms. Jenner an award for courage. President Obama also praised her. Not to be outdone, Chelsea Manning hopped on Ms. Jenner’s gender train on Twitter, gushing, “I am so much more aware of my emotions; much more sensitive emotionally (and physically).”

Image credit: Julie Doucet

Image credit: Julie Doucet

A part of me winced.

I have fought for many of my 68 years against efforts to put women — our brains, our hearts, our bodies, even our moods — into tidy boxes, to reduce us to hoary stereotypes. Suddenly, I find that many of the people I think of as being on my side — people who proudly call themselves progressive and fervently support the human need for self-determination — are buying into the notion that minor differences in male and female brains lead to major forks in the road and that some sort of gendered destiny is encoded in us.

That’s the kind of nonsense that was used to repress women for centuries. But the desire to support people like Ms. Jenner and their journey toward their truest selves has strangely and unwittingly brought it back.

People who haven’t lived their whole lives as women, whether Ms. Jenner or Mr. Summers, shouldn’t get to define us. That’s something men have been doing for much too long. And as much as I recognize and endorse the right of men to throw off the mantle of maleness, they cannot stake their claim to dignity as transgender people by trampling on mine as a woman.

————

Read the rest of this article HERE.

(Photo: BBC) Louis Theroux with "transgender" boy and his parents

(Photo: BBC) Louis Theroux with “transgender” boy and his parents

From Samantha Rea at the Huffington Post:

“As a tween, I was self-conscious about developing. Even now, the word makes me wince. I stopped going swimming at around the age of 11. I didn’t like it, I said. I pulled out of Brownie camp, insisting, “I just don’t want to go.” The truth was, I’d heard you had to wash in a big bin, in front of each other. I was excruciatingly self-conscious about my body, about my breasts. And if you’re imagining I had anything to stop traffic, the answer is no. I was around a bra size 30A.

I wanted to slice off my breasts with a bacon slicer. I didn’t know what a bacon slicer was, but I imagined it would slice off breasts pretty well. Fortunately, I made it through puberty with my breasts intact, but had my parents been less no-nonsense, had they heard of transgender children and had we been living in America today, I might have been given a mastectomy.

Sound far fetched? In Louis Theroux’s documentary, Transgender Kids shown at the weekend, we actually see the mastectomy scars on a teenager. “There’s a little bit of redness,” says Theroux, diplomatically, as we look at the glaring, red scars across the child’s chest. Amaya’s “top only dysphoria” became an issue around the age of 11 or 12 when developing caused, “a little bit of an anxiety issue… in terms of going out in public… the way other people were perceiving me.” This sounds like a normal reaction to developing. You don’t fix awkwardness with an operation.

We meet other children on the programme. Camille, born Sebastian, is a five-year-old who repeatedly uses the word transgender. I wondered – along with many others on Twitter – how a five-year-old had come to use this word. We see Camille in a tiara, applying lipstick and wearing a dress to school. Theroux asks dad Eduardo if perhaps, rather than needing to transition, Camille is still exploring. Eduardo says no, “I don’t think there’s any more exploring.”

We’re introduced to Catch, a 36-year-old female to male transgender, at an appointment to discuss phalloplasty. Catch talks about being at primary school and wanting to wee standing up. We meet Cole, sometimes Crystal, whose friends know what to call him depending on, “what clothes I’m wearing that day, like if I want to wear these kind of clothes I’m a girl, if I wear those kind of clothes I’m a boy.” He says that as Cole, he does: “more things a boy can do.”

As a feminist with a background in gender studies, I believe that gender is culturally constructed – that we need to break down gender stereotypes, rather than reinforce them. This means we need to stop segregating activities, clothes, toys and colours according to gender. Instead of dressing girls in pink and boys in blue, we need to throw away the rule book and, “rid the world of gender rules and regulations.”

Click HERE to read more.

[image added by me-GM]

It broke my heart.

January 11, 2015

It broke my heart

“I’m a Guy”

September 23, 2014

 

insert head

insert head

Questioning if trans is different than butch?(self.asktransgender)

submitted 6 hours ago by mrhorseass

I’ve always been gender non-conforming, like acting like a tomboy and preferring male clothing. During puberty I felt intense distress about getting breasts and curves. Throughout my life I felt masculine and comfortable with a flat chest so puberty was very hard to go through. As a result of this I wore baggy clothing and jackets during the summers. I have strong feelings of body dysphoria. My body is my main source of distress. Being called female or she does not bother me too much but my real struggle right now is my body. For a while I was convinced that I was trans but after reading a couple blogs from radfems I began considering that maybe trans does not exist and instead these feelings are grown from the gender binary in society. I once believed trans was a medically condition so I had no problem going through with it but now that I feel it is not so I can no longer transition. This is terrible because I still have imtense feelings of body dysphoria and am very uncomfortable in my own skin.

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pflag

Actual graphic of the “new” PFLAG’s “pro-sex-role” print media campaign

PFLAG (Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays) was initially formed as a group that supported parents coming to terms with the fact that their kids were gay, back when gay was a terrible, awful thing to be. They ran support groups and such in a pre-internet age for parents desperate for information.

Like many lesbian and gay organizations PFLAG eventually became obsolete as “gay became okay”. Parents and friends of lesbians and gays no longer require the infrastructure of support groups and the outreach network once provided by the PFLAG organization, due to the successful activism of an entire generation of “out” lesbians and gays.

But the political capital and “name recognition” of the now defunct PFLAG organization still has a certain cache, and so has been colonized by members of the transgender movement, who espouse an explicitly anti-gay, anti-feminist platform which is completely at odds with the original PFLAG mandate.

According to the anti-gay transgenderists who are now operating under the PFLAG moniker, lesbians and gays discriminate against and are oppressive to heterosexuals because of our same-sex orientation, which is based on biological sex instead of social gender role.

The current genderist “New PFLAG” platform says that individuals have distinct and inborn innate psychological, intellectual, and personality traits caused by our reproductive biology. And… surprise! These innate differences are evidenced by adherence to norms of behavior which ritualize female subordination to male domination. The “New PFLAG” claims that failure to perform sex-roles is a medical emergency requiring drugs and surgeries designed to disguise sex-role deformed kids as members of the opposite sex. Such deformed children should then try to “pass” as opposite sexed persons in order to uphold sex stereotypes. This medicalization and plastic surgery corrective approach to kids who reject sex stereotypical social roles is somehow supposed to be liberatory and progressive.

What was once a lifeline for parents seeking support for kids who rejected heterosexual and gender mandates now promotes this:

 

[This is NOT a joke! What follows is the ACTUAL new “Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays” media campaign.]